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Keynote Lectures

Evolving Systems and Their Automotive Applications
Dimitar Filev, Research & Advanced Engineering, Ford Motor Company, United States

On Some Open-ended Challenges in Model-based Fault Management for Aerospace Systems: A Look Backwards and Forwards
Ali Zolghadri, University of Bordeaux - CNRS, France

To be announced soon.
Evangelos Theodorou, Georgia Institute of Technology, United States

 

Evolving Systems and Their Automotive Applications

Dimitar Filev
Research & Advanced Engineering, Ford Motor Company
United States
 

Brief Bio
Dr. Dimitar Filev is a Henry Ford Technical Fellow at the Ford Research & Innovation Center, Dearborn, Michigan. He is conducting research in computational intelligence, AI and control, and their applications to vehicle systems, autonomous driving, and automotive engineering.  Dr. Filev has published 4 books, over 200 journal articles and conference papers, and holds over 100 US and foreign patents.  He is the recipient of the 2008 Norbert Wiener Award of the IEEE SMC Society and the 2015 Pioneer’s Award of the IEEE CIS Society. He received his PhD. degree in Electrical Engineering from the Czech Technical University in Prague in 1979.  Dr. Filev is a Fellow of IEEE and a member of the NAE. He is past president of the IEEE Systems, Man, & Cybernetics Society (2016-2017).


Abstract
The emerging trend of increasing flexibility, adaptation, and autonomy of control and information systems is the driving force behind the evolving systems paradigm. Evolving systems are characterized with flexible model structure that adjusts to changes which cannot be solely handled by parameter adaptation. Evolving systems develop their structure and knowledge representation through continuous learning from data and interaction with the environment. They exploit synergies between two powerful concepts – real time data granulation and machine learning - with no limitations on the types of the model structure that may include regression models, neural networks, fuzzy, and/or stochastic models. Practical applications encompass a wide range of systems with variable parameters and structure, and multiple operating modes. This presentation provides an overview of the multiple facets of evolving systems theory and describes some of their automotive applications to adaptive process control, automated calibration, anomaly detection, driver state estimation, and fuel economy optimization.



 

 

On Some Open-ended Challenges in Model-based Fault Management for Aerospace Systems: A Look Backwards and Forwards

Ali Zolghadri
University of Bordeaux - CNRS
France
 

Brief Bio
Ali Zolghadri is a professor in Control & System Engineering at the University of Bordeaux, France. His research deals with model-based fault diagnosis, estimation and observation issues and fault-tolerant control & guidance methods. Over the last fifteen years, his focus has been on aerospace and flight-critical systems. More recently, he is conducting cross-domain research on fault management in interconnected, hybrid and distributed engineered systems using symbolic and abstraction-based methods. Between 2001 and 2015, he had been head of ARIA research team, IMS-lab, CNRS-Bordeaux University. He has authored and co-authored over 75 papers in leading international journals, about 130 communications in international conferences, one Springer book and 12 book chapters. He is a co-holder of 14 patents (French and US) in the aerospace field. He has been coordinator of a number of collaborative French, European and international research projects and actions in control and aeronautics. He is member of TC “Aerospace” and “Safeprocess" of IFAC and Council of European Aerospace Societies. He has served as a program committee member and international advisory board member for various international conferences and has given many invited keynotes, plenary talks and seminaries during international events. He has been member of executive committee of France’s Aerospace Valley Cluster and received an award for excellence in 2010 from the French Aeronautics and Space Foundation. He is the recipient of the 2016 CNRS Innovation Medal for outstanding scientific research with innovative applications in the technological and societal fields.


Abstract
Aerospace has always been a powerful engine of innovation. When we look to the future, it is not obvious to predict where the things are going but there is no doubt that the vector is pointed toward more autonomy and intelligence and that aerospace systems are becoming more distributed and more connected. Nevertheless, the maturity of technologies remains overriding and unconventional technologies are only adopted if there is a proven need that cannot adequately addressed through conventional employed techniques. This is mainly because under today airworthiness codes and regulations, any structural alteration to the in-service solutions entails risk and may require up to several years of V&V activities and maturation. Yet, regulatory standards evolve as the industry matures and thanks to new innovative and disruptive technologies and digital transformation, a greater period of innovation is being opened to shape the future of aerospace. The talk will start with the current situation and a look backwards: about a half-century after the early academic works in model-based / data-driven fault management, there exists today a widening gap between advanced academic methods and real-world aerospace applications. The talk will attempt to highlight some of the main reasons for this situation. Next, the talk will argue that for the foreseeable future and given the predicted demands on aviation and aerospace industry, new distributed/cooperative model-based fault management methodologies will be required to enable paradigm shifts in future flight operational issues management. They can act as a bridge between today’s operations and tomorrow’s demands. However, such design techniques should shift from traditional monolithic and disciplinary approaches to espouse a more global and cross-domain approach by taking into account heterogeneous physical components, integrated computational capabilities, and communication supports. Solutions will arise from research at the interface between system & control theory and computer science. Finally, the talk will discuss a future paradigm shift in civil aviation operations toward more autonomy in the cockpit, and some related challenges and opportunities.



 

 

To be announced soon.

Evangelos Theodorou
Georgia Institute of Technology
United States
 

Brief Bio
Available soon.


Abstract
Available soon.



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